The gaur: an effective weeder

On the tea plantations, I come up against a variety of creatures: charming ladybirds, stunning dragonflies, beautiful butterflies, spiders of all sorts, some harmless, others not, tarantulas, leeches, passerines, birds of prey, rodents, worms, mongooses, snakes as long as my arm, including cobras, roe deer and much more. I only meet the Indian bison – the gaur – in Southern India. They are incredibly powerful. It takes several tigers, still present in this region, to bring one down. Gaurs walk quite daintily among the tea plants. While they don’t eat the leaves of these shrubs, they do munch on all the undesirable plants that grow between rows. It’s a good way to keep the weeds down.


Posted in Country : India by François-Xavier Delmas | Tags : , ,

Adam’s Peak

blog-06-11-2015

Many Sri Lankans have climbed the slopes of Adam’s Peak at least once in their lifetime.

It is a place of pilgrimage for Buddhists, who worship Buddha’s footprint at the summit, but also for Hindus, Muslims and Christians. The ascent begins with a walk through a tea field, which you cross on your way to the top.


Posted in Country : Sri Lanka by François-Xavier Delmas | Tags : , , ,

See the world in a different way

blog-17-07-2015

Many of you spend hours in front of a computer screen. However, the world cannot be reduced to a few inches. To give you a different view of the world, I propose this photo, which you can use as wallpaper for your screen. For people with a sedentary lifestyle, it is recommended to take some time out to stretch, relax, walk a little. I also recommend you enjoy looking at this landscape while drinking your daily cup of favourite tea.


Posted in Country: Malawi by François-Xavier Delmas | Tags : ,

Leaf by leaf

blog-03-04-2015

It is difficult to imagine what tea processing involves in terms of expertise and refinement. Here, for example, the production process has been completed, and this woman is going through the leaves one by one to remove tiny stems and other imperfections.


Posted in Country : Nepal by François-Xavier Delmas | Tags : ,

Labour shortage in Nepal

blog-21-11-2014

Nowadays, the main problem facing Nepalese tea producers is a labour shortage. A significant portion of the population has left to find work in the Gulf countries or in Malaysia. This means the tea is only plucked once a fortnight on some mountains, which compromises its quality. Luckily, the plantations that produce the best teas are less affected. This problem does not only concern tea. The whole of the country’s manufacturing and farming sectors have been hit too.


Posted in Country : Nepal by François-Xavier Delmas | Tags : , ,

The author

François-Xavier Delmas is a passionate globetrotter. He’s been touring the world’s tea plantations for more than 20 years in search of the finest teas. As the founder of Le Palais des Thés, he believes that travelling is all about discovering world cultures. From Darjeeling to Shizuoka, from Taiwan to the Golden Triangle, he invites you to follow his trips as well as share his experiences and emotions.

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